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At a meeting of Tower Hamlets Council (21st January 2015), the Labour Group proposed and passed a motion calling for the Docklands Sailing Centre to be protected from the consequences of property development – some of which may prevent the continued use of the Millwall Docks for use by the Docklands Sailing Centre Trust.

Open spaces are under increasing pressure to meet the needs of our growing population; it is important to protect them for current and future generations. Sailing and other water sports require stable and predictable wind conditions and the shape and height of buildings matter enormously when alongside water used for sailing.

The school, social housing and park that form part of the Westferry Print Works application are welcome, but these should not be traded for the Sailing Centre. With sensitive design, the borough can have both the development and the Sailing Centre. Sustainable development is very important.

Key Facts

  • The Sailing Centre is used by 15,000 people every year
    • 8,000 of which are children
    • 9 young people training with national squads (6 from TH – possibility of a TH competitor at a future Olympics)
    • The Royal Yachting Association says the Docklands Sailing Centre is:
      • Number 1 sailing training centre in the UK
      • Number 1 youth sailing training centre in the UK
      • Number 1 sail racing centre in the UK

Cllr Dave Chesterton, of Tower Hamlets Labour Group, said:

“The Docklands Sailing Centre, secured in the 1980s after a long campaign by local people, is the jewel in Tower Hamlets Crown. The Sailing Centre, rated the best sailing training centre in the UK, is a charity that doesn’t require public grant funding.

Open spaces are under increasing pressure to meet the needs of our growing population; we must protect them for current and future generations. We need sustainable development to protect important assets such as the Docklands Sailing Centre.

That’s why we have called on the Council to exercise its powers as local planning authority, to ensure any development on the West Ferry Print Works site does not cause any detriment to sailing and use of the Millwall Docks from Docklands Sailing Centre.”

Jim Fitzpatrick, MP for Poplar & Limehouse, said:

“The Sailing Centre is a hugely important community asset. It must be protected to allow it to continue to be used and enjoyed by all its members and supporters. Every effort must be made to allow it to survive and prosper and it’s to the credit of the Labour Group that it is leading in this regard.”

Labour passes council motion calling on the Docklands Sailing Centre to be protected

At a meeting of Tower Hamlets Council (21st January 2015), the Labour Group proposed and passed a motion calling for the Docklands Sailing Centre to be protected from the consequences...

Ed Miliband will tomorrow (Tuesday) warn that our NHS, one of Britain’s most precious institutions, faces “its most perilous moment” when voters go to the polls at a General Election now just 100 days away.

He will say the next government must rescue the health service from a Tory plan that has already caused crisis over the past five years - and now, if the Conservatives win a second term, threatens to leave it unrecognisable.

Speaking immediately before Andy Burnham reveals Labour’s 10-year plan for the NHS, Mr Miliband will herald it as a blueprint to raise standards of care and ensure the health service is sustainable in the 21st century. 

Speaking in Trafford, where the first NHS hospital was opened in 1948, he will unveil Labour’s third pledge to the British people:

“Build an NHS with the time to care:  20,000 more nurses and 8,000 more GPs. Join up services from home to hospital, guaranteeing GP appointments within 48 hours and cancer tests within one week.”

He will commit the next government to restoring the right values to the NHS, making strategic investments in staff, and delivering reforms that will improve services and save billions of pounds.

These include integrating care, placing a new emphasis on prevention, and ensuring better access to services - so patients do not end up in hospital unless they need it. 

He will say Labour is determined to drive out the culture of limiting social care at home for frail, older and vulnerable to just 15 minutes, saying it is a symbol of what has gone wrong in the NHS where failure and false economies threaten the financial future of the service.

And he will outline how Labour’s 10-Year plan will:

  • INVEST IN STAFF SO THE NHS HAS TIME TO CARE
  • INTEGRATE CARE FROM HOME TO HOSPITAL
  • GIVE PATIENTS NEW RIGHTS TO ACCESS CARE
  • END THE NEGLECT OF MENTAL HEALTH
  • PREVENT ILL-HEALTH
  • RESTORE THE RIGHT VALUES TO THE NHS

Immediately after Mr Miliband has launched Labour’s election pledge, Andy Burnham, the Shadow Health Secretary, will deliver a further speech in London to the King’s Fund where he will set out more details of Labour’s plan for the NHS.

Mr Burnham will say false economies in social care have increased pressure on NHS funding with the number of avoidable hospital admissions soaring last year to a record high of more than half a million - costing the NHS around £1 billion.

He will explain how:

  • Labour’s plan to integrate services from home to hospital will help end 15-minute care slots through new year-of-care budgets, incentivising providers to improve social care and prevent vulnerable patients falling ill or injuring themselves.
  • The next government will create a new arm of the NHS:  5,000 homecare workers within the NHS to help those with the greatest needs, including the terminally ill so they can stay with their family at the end of life, and those who are leaving hospital who need extra help if they are to move back into their homes.
  • All vulnerable older people would be offered a safety check to identify risks to their health like cold homes, loneliness and the likelihood of them falling so that problems can be tackled and they avoid unnecessary hospital visits.

An NHS Equal to the Challenges of the 21st Century

Ed Miliband will tomorrow (Tuesday) warn that our NHS, one of Britain’s most precious institutions, faces “its most perilous moment” when voters go to the polls at a General Election...

 Figures from the Met’s Confidence Comparator show 48% of people living in Tower Hamlets feel the Met do not provide visible policing presence in their area

-          Across the capital figures show 47% of Londoners feel the Met do not provide visible policing presence in their area

-          Mayor set to miss target to increase public confidence in the Met by 20%

London Assembly Member John Biggs AM has called on the Mayor to rethink his cuts to neighbourhood policing after new research found that 48% of people in Tower Hamlets do not believe the Met have a visible police presence in the area.

The data, drawn from the Met’s recently launched ‘Confidence Comparator’ found that just 52% of local residents felt police were providing a visible policing presence in Tower Hamlets with some areas of the borough seen to be worse than others. In some parts of the borough, this figure was as low as 46%

There is a similar picture forming across the Capital, with 47% of Londoners saying the police do not have a visible presence in their respective areas.

The figures have sparked criticism of the Mayor of London’s decision to cut back neighbourhood policing teams from six uniformed officers to only two, with John Biggs calling on the Mayor to put more police officers back into boroughs. Since the current Government came to power 4,333 police officers and PCSOs have been lost from London’s streets, including 227 from Tower Hamlets.

The Mayor commissioned a review of the new neighbourhood policing units in July 2014 but has so far refused to release the review’s findings despite concerns that the new setup is leaving neighbourhood policing stretched. The worrying confidence figures come only a week after it was revealed that violent crime in the capital rose 22% last year, rising by almost 17% in Tower Hamlets.

London Assembly Member John Biggs said AM said:

“With 227 fewer uniformed officers on Tower Hamlets’ streets since the Government came to power it’s no surprise that many local people do not feel that there is a visible police presence in Tower Hamlets.

“It’s now very likely that the Mayor will miss his target to increase public confidence by 20% and it’s not hard to see why. The cuts to police numbers and the Mayor’s decision to dismantle neighbourhood policing teams have clearly been noticed by people in Tower Hamlets and indeed across the Capital. It’s increasingly clear that we need to see more officers back on the beat in our local neighbourhoods.”

48% say police don’t have a visible presence in Tower Hamlets

 Figures from the Met’s Confidence Comparator show 48% of people living in Tower Hamlets feel the Met do not provide visible policing presence in their area -          Across the capital...

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