Latest Stories

 

§  Figures obtained by John Biggs AM suggest where 588 frontline staff are set to be cut from across London Underground stations, with some stations losing up to 58% of staff.

 

§  More than 28% of visible staff set to be axed from Bethnal Green and Stepney Green stations.

 

 

 

Analysis of TfL staffing plans by Labour London Assembly Member John Biggs has shown that under current proposals staffing levels across London Underground stations are set to be cut by an average of almost 16% from January.

 

 In Tower Hamlets the following stations will see major staff cuts:

  • Bethnal Green a reduction of 29.71, 4.1full time equivalent staff, Stepney Green a reduction of 28.33%, 3.4 full time equivalent staff and Canary Wharf, a reduction of 516.76%, 6 full time equivalent staff.

The projected changes show that 216 stations will have their staffing numbers cut, with around 588 staff due to be shed in total across the network.

The staff cuts will come as part of the planned closure of all the capital’s tube station ticket offices, despite the Mayor previously pledging to protect all ticket offices from cuts. The staff cuts vary across the tube station network with some stations losing over half their staff.

John Biggs AM, Labour London Assembly Member for City & East London, said:

“It beggars belief that with tube fares due to rise by 2.5% in January, Boris Johnson has the nerve to cut front line staffing levels at stations by an average of 16% across London. In Tower Hamlets we will lose over 28% of staff from two of our stations leaving passengers being forced to pay more money for less staff support.

“Politicians are often in the business of demanding more for less. It seems in this case Boris Johnson is happy with tube passengers getting less for more.

“The issue isn’t necessarily whether staff are based in ticket offices or on the station concourse, but whether staffing levels can provide all customers – especially the disabled and elderly – with a good service. I am calling on TfL to address this issue and to await the outcome of TravelWatch’s consultation survey before finalising plans. It is deplorable that TfL is not carrying out its own station by station consultation, so it is even more important that they take TravelWatch’s findings into account.”

Revealed: TfL plans to cut up to 29.71% of tube station staff in Tower Hamlets

  §  Figures obtained by John Biggs AM suggest where 588 frontline staff are set to be cut from across London Underground stations, with some stations losing up to 58%...

On Wednesday 10 September, Jim Fitzpatrick, Member of Parliament for Poplar and Limehouse attended the launch of Mencap’s Hear my voice campaign in the House of Commons.

The new campaign is about empowering people with a learning disability and their families to make sure their voices are heard by their local MPs and candidates in the lead up to the May 2015 General Election.

There are 1.4 million people with a learning disability in the UK but many feel they are not listened to by those in power and the issues they that are important to them – like hate crime, better healthcare and education – are often not talked about.

 

Jim was one of the MPs confirming their support for the campaign at yesterday’s event.

 

Jim Fitzpatrick MP said:

“People with a learning disability and their families are as much a part of our society as anyone else and deserve to have their voices heard on the issues that matter to them. I am listening and I hope that many more MPs and potential candidates will do the same by getting on board with Mencap’s Hear my voice campaign.”

 

Over 40 MPs attended the launch event where people with a learning disability and their families talked to them about the campaign and the things that matter most to them.

 

MPs showed their support by signing-up to say, “I’m listening”, on the new campaign website: www.hear-my-voice-org-uk

 

Through the campaign website, people with a learning disability and their families are given a space to share their experiences with their local MP and, in return, MPs and candidates are able to show their support by signing up to say they are listening.

 

MPs also received a copy of the Mencap Manifesto, which contained the issues that matter most to people with a learning disability and their families and on which they want to see action from the next UK government. These include improving healthcare for people with a learning disability, ending disability hate crime and improving support in education.

 

MPs were then presented with exclusive regional polling data* relevant to their constituencies, which revealed a national call for urgent action to be taken by the next UK government to tackle learning disability discrimination and exclusion.

 

The event opened with a speech from Mencap President, Lord Brian Rix, who called on all MPs and future candidates to listen to what matters to people with a learning disability and their families. Further speeches were given by 19-year-old Mencap Young Ambassador, Aaron, and siblings Jonathan and Jayne Ridd who lost their brother whilst in NHS care.

 

Mencap President, Lord Brian Rix, said:

“There are 1.4 million people in the UK with a learning disability and 6 million more family members and carers connected to them. However they often tell us they feel they are not listened to by politicians and subsequently many of the challenges they face go unheard and unresolved. We are asking Members of Parliament and prospective candidates to listen to what people with a learning disability and their families have to say.”

 

Mencap Young Ambassador Aaron, who is 19-years-old, didn’t get the extra support he needed with reading and writing when he was at school. He said:

“If I’d had more support I could have got better grades and my life could be very different. I think there should be more training for teachers and people who work in schools so they recognise people who need support and understand people’s needs. I’m talking to you today because I hope you, as MPs, want to make a difference and stand up for people with as well. We want to go forwards, not backwards.”

 

Mencap’s chief executive, Jan Tregelles, also attended the event. She said:

“It was encouraging to see so many MPs listening to people with a learning disability and their families talking about the problems they face and the change they want to see in the next parliament. They are the experts in what matters to them, so prospective candidates should be listening to what they are out on the campaign trail.

 

To find out more about the Hear my voice campaign and Manifesto, visit: www.hear-my-voice.org.uk

Local MP supports campaign to make the voices of people with a learning disability heard in general election campaign

On Wednesday 10 September, Jim Fitzpatrick, Member of Parliament for Poplar and Limehouse attended the launch of Mencap’s Hear my voice campaign in the House of Commons. The new campaign...

Forces in Tower Hamlets face a 9% vacancy rate;

-       Vacancies leave Tower Hamlets without 19 sergeants and 44 constables;

-       High vacancy rates leave ‘a gaping hole at the heart of the Met’;

-       Figures show a £13.7m Met underspend on police officer pay, suggesting that that vacancies have been sitting open as part of a cost saving exercise.

New figures obtained by Labour London Assembly Member Joanne McCartney show that in May this year (the latest period available) there were 1,209 vacancies for police sergeants and constables across the capital’s borough forces.

The high vacancy rates come on top of significant cuts in police numbers since the Government came to power, with official figures showing 29 police officers and PCSOs cut from Tower Hamlets’ streets between May 2010 and May 2014, and 4,694 from London’s streets overall. A report last year also found that the Met’s proportion of officers deemed ‘visible’ was the third lowest in England and Wales.

Tower Hamlets is one of 14 London boroughs with vacancy rates of over 6%, with five facing double digit deficits. Harrow is shown to have the highest percentage of vacancies, with 15% of its sergeant and constable posts unfilled. Waltham Forest had the highest overall number, with 72 vacancies from a force of 664.

The figures were revealed after HMIC warned that “forces across England and Wales plan to achieve most of their savings by reducing the number of police officers, PCSOs and police staff… most of the savings [of the MPS] come from reducing the size of the workforce.”

Labour London Assembly for City & East London, John Biggs said:

“In his manifesto Boris Johnson pledged to put more officers on the beat. In reality what we have seen is 29 police officers and PCSOs cut from Tower Hamlets’ streets since this Government came to power. Now we learn that on top of that 9% of Tower Hamlets ‘sergeants and constables are missing due to unfilled vacancies, that’s 63 extra officers who should be on our streets. It is an absolute scandal that police numbers have been allowed to fall this low, these vacancies are leaving a gaping hole at the heart of our local police force.

“Whilst a small churn in the number of officers is to be expected, these are deeply concerning figures. With so many positions unfilled we need to ask not only what impact that has on policing, but why the Mayor of London Boris Johnson has allowed it to happen in the first place. Either the depth of officer morale is so low they are haemorrhaging officers, or these posts are being kept open to keep costs down. Either way the Mayor should take immediate action to ensure our police force is up to strength and vacancies are filled as quickly as possible.”

63 unfilled police officer vacancies across Tower Hamlets according to new figures

Forces in Tower Hamlets face a 9% vacancy rate; -       Vacancies leave Tower Hamlets without 19 sergeants and 44 constables; -       High vacancy rates leave ‘a gaping hole at the...

More Stories >

The Labour Party will place cookies on your computer to help us make this website better.

Please read this to review the updates about which cookies we use and what information we collect on our site.

To find out more about these cookies, see our privacy notice. Use of this site confirms your acceptance of these cookies.